Friday, October 29, 2010

Pillow Pup Update: Every Dog Needs a Pal

My little "pillow pup" is all grown up and is at the ripe old age of 7.  He's healthy and still is addicted to playing with a tennis ball.  Although we have noticed that he has reduced the number of times he has run in to a tree or pole while chasing the ball.

A couple of years ago, his companion who was an older female left us.  She had spent her life happily giving us love and bossing around the "pillow pup."  After her death, we spent many hours holding him and each other as we grieved for the loss of our girl.

What we didn't know was the effect her death had on our young dog.  He didn't want to eat, didn't want to play ball (much), and just generally laid close to my feet during the day.

Could he be depressed?

After a couple of months had passed, I suggested we look around for a lap puppy for me and as a companion to "pillow pup."

Times have changed.  This time around, we went online and looked at hundreds of dogs listed on a pet adoption site.  We could easily drive the distance for many of these dogs.

Finally, I found a puppy, and I mean a puppy.  I eagerly sent my application in and waited.  Now, rescue shelters have a tendency to check up on the prospective family.  They contact the vet and sometimes, even neighbors just to make sure you will provide a super home for the little tykes.

We fostered one little young dog for two nights.  It started out ok.  My older "pillow pup" ignored him for the most part.  But the young dog didn't ignore our household.  He started growling and showing signs of aggression to the children.  What was really strange was he would snap at them after getting out of their laps.  And then he snarled and chased the younger child.  Sorry, he was gone soon after.

So, back to the computer we went to find another lap puppy.  Oh, what a cutie this small puppy is.  Again, we sent off another application.  This time, I was interviewed for 1 hour on the phone before I could see the little tyke.

We agreed we would come to see the little guy on Sunday and we would bring the older dog with us.  After all, he also had to like the little tyke.  As we sat on the floor at the Henry County Humane Society, we enjoyed seeing and playing with so many of the little guys and gals.  We really liked the little tyke, but we weren't so sure that our older dog was really going to enjoy the puppy antics of having his tail constantly pulled by the little pup.

We were looking at some of the other dogs when the volunteer suggested we look at the black poodle in the back, the one who was cowering and didn't even come over to the fence to say hello.  She brought him out and he immediatly went from lap to lap and kissed everyone.  And then he decided to show us how perfect he could be.  We were stilling looking at the little tyke and had added another small dog into the contest to come home with us.

The black poodle was just kind of there in the background.  The little tyke would grab a toy.  The poodle would grab a toy.  The little tyke would roll over.  The poodle would roll over.  The poodle came and sat in my lap as we continued to look at other dogs.

We put him back so we could continue to look at the other lap puppy sized dogs.  The white poodle was snooty and wanted nothing to do with us.  As the volunteer took her back to the enclosure, the little black poodle came running out and jumped over the other 4 dogs there in order to get back out to us.

I guess he had already made up his mind and had packed his bags.

It took us four hours to decide that day as we wanted them all.  But, as you can guess, we brought the little black poodle home.  We just couldn't disappoint him after he tried so hard to impress us.

As for the 65 pound pillow pup, he started eating again.  He started playing again.  He now has a pal,   er,  Buddy.

And I have a lap puppy. Nearly.


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Thursday, October 28, 2010

I Want a Lap Puppy

After being pleaded with for a couple of years by the kids, we finally decided to go see what pets were available for adoption.  We had an older dog who was not a lap puppy by any stretch of the imagination, so I agreed we could have another dog if, and only if, it was a small lap puppy.

Walking in the big box pet store where there were pet adoptions being held, I heard a big bark.  So I followed the bark and went in search for my lap puppy.  The small dogs at the event were completely unappealing to me.  They just didn't look cute.  So I made the executive decision to leave them for another family.  We would just look another time.

While my kids were busy lapping up the attention by the bigger dogs, I turned my attention to the big bark.  He was a russet long hair something or another that was still a pup, but he was not a lap puppy.

I started to talk and pet him while waiting for the rest of the family to realize that I had not seen any lap puppy.  He was extremely eager for attention.  The adoption lady from the rescue group explained he was turned in by a family that had five boys.  Five?  Yes, five.  And not one of them seemed to have time to play with the dog or take care of it.  The mom wouldn't let him in the house, so he was cooped up in the garage until they decided to ditch him at a mere seven months of age.

"He's rather cute," I said as I petted him again.  "In fact, his head looks just like Rod Stewart with his blonde highlights on top."

My spouse walked up just as I mentioned Rod and he groaned.  Somehow he knew where this was headed as I was a true blue fan of Rod  "in the day."

"Just let me sit and hold him."  The older child came over and also commented on his highlights.  The younger child hung back as the pup's face was at the same height as hers.

"He's too big for a young child.  He's still too much of a puppy.  And we all know how puppies can play,"  said the spouse.

"Just let me sit and hold him."

So, I sat and held him.  Well, rather, he put his legs on either side of my body and just stood there as I was trapped underneath him.  The children were standoffish and refused to pet him.  "He's too big, and his mouth is huge."

"But he's so cute.  Tell you what, why don't we foster him since they need a spot for him for a couple of days?"

And with that statement, our lives changed.  The big dog with the Rod spikey blonde tips on top came home and promptly jumped up on the children and grabbed the mittens off of their hands.  Screams echoed in the air.

"He's just a pup.  He wants to play," my spouse said.

It was a mere 34 degress outside and the big dog with the cute Rod spikey blonde tips on top hopped into the pond.  Arrggggghhhhh.

Fast forward to a couple of days later.  The rescue people dropped by to check on him and to let me know they hadn't found another foster family.  How was the dog with the young children?

"The little one is just not sure about him.  His mouth is at her eye level and she is scared.  He seems gentle enough, as long as there are no gloves in the area.  And my fish are stressed out because he keeps jumping in the pond."

The rescue lady replied, "Look how much calmer he is than on Sunday.  Can you give him a few more days before I take him elsewhere?"

The next week, I decided to ask the children if they thought we should keep the dog.  The older one had gotten used to him and decided he was ok.  She even offered to pay half the adoption fee.  The younger one was still not convinced.

Another week went by and the younger child holds up her little hand with five fingers spread wide and says, "He can stay for another five weeks and that's it."

Weeks?  Maybe she meant days?  No matter, because by the end of the day, she was using him for a pillow as she watched Clifford on TV.

Ahh.  I didn't get a lap puppy after all. Instead I got a floor pillow.


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Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Saved from the Ashes on Her Last Day

Our staff has accepted the challenge to participate in the Iams Home 4 the Holidays Blog Hop.  After you finish wiping the tears from your eyes, won't you help shelters with the stroke of your pen?  The Fayette Front Page will post your heartwarming adoption stories in conjunction with Blog Hop through October 31.

It was time.  I was ready to open my heart and love again after the death of my precious poodle Leo, who I had for 12 years.

I had never had a dog from a shelter before.  When I was growing up, we raised Dalmatians and so I thought I would find a reputable breeder and get one. On the other hand, my spouse had always gone to the local shelter to find his pets.

He talked me into going to the Cobb County Shelter just to see what they had.  I found a Dalmatian!  I was thrilled.  She was beautiful, weighed 90 pounds and could pull me around the bonding room.  I was in love.

And then my spouse made the observation that I might have difficulty with such a large dog as I attempted to take care of my toddler and the stroller on walks.

Reluctantly, I agreed.  Although I did put my name down on the wait list for this gorgeous dog.

We were leaving, when my spouse stopped at a cage and said, "I want to see that dog."

Why?  She was timid, and not pretty and I was not attracted to her at all.

The staff brought her in the bonding room where the dog shivered.  They said she was a stray and it was her last day.  No one had wanted her so she would be put down the next day.

My spouse said, "I'll take her."

"But I'm getting the beautiful Dalmatian."

"So, we'll have two."

He walked right up and paid for the scrappy looking dog and home she went.

That scrappy little black terrier mix was a gentle soul.  Her age was estimated between 2 and 4.  She was the perfect dog for my toddler.

We named her "Cinder."  Cinder wouldn't come out to my husband unless he was sitting down and had food.  She followed me everywhere.  We had beds for her behind and under furniture since that was her place of comfort.  She was so quiet that guests in our home would not know she existed as she cowered in her bed.

She was gentle with the babies and harsh on the young pups.  She didn't like to play, but she wouldn't let any other dog have any toys.  Instead, she would grab them, and put them in her bed to guard.

Dear, sweet Cinder.  We had her for 7 years.  She started slowing down so much that we were unable to walk her.  When she participated in her last Doggie Dash in Peachtree City, we had to flag down a golf cart as she couldn't make the 5 mile walk.  She and I were carried over the finish line accompanied by large applause.

Dear, sweet Cinder.  I held her paw on that last fateful day as she raised her head and licked me one more time.  After that, my daughter and I talked and petted her through to the other side.

Dear, sweet Cinder.  We thought we had saved her from the ashes.  Instead, she graced us with her gentleness and devotion.

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Tuesday, October 26, 2010

Thinking of Evidence

Evidence is a male zebra who was found on I-75 south of Atlanta in 2008.  His rescue and subsequent recovery by Noah's Ark in Locust Grove are encouraging and phenomenal.  I'm guessing the weather is just right to make the trip back down to see Evidence and his friends.

Click here to see Evidence as he made his public debut in the summer of 2008.


While Evidence is no longer homeless, Noah's Ark Animal Rehabilitation Center in Locust Grove, GA, is always in need of a helping hand with food.  Not only does Noah's Ark rescue wild animals, they also have rescue dogs for adoption, and they are the home for some abused children.

Wouldn't it be great if Iams would also donate food to this worthy group? 

Noah's Ark uses over 800 pounds of dry dog food each day. 

Learn more about Noah's Ark and let your heart be touched......

http://www.noahs-ark.org/

Update  10/27/2010:  Harry's Market in Atlanta (think yummy) has just asked what types of food donations Noah's Ark needs.  Perhaps they will be a huge blessing for the over 1000 mouths there that need food daily.  


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Photo Credit:  AS Eldredge



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DogTime Media Partners with ASPCA to Support Adoption of Shelter Dogs and Cats Nationwide

/PRNewswire/ -- DogTime Media, the largest online vertical media community reaching pet owners, today announced a partnership with the ASPCA® (The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals®) that brings a database of national adoptable dogs and cats to the ASPCA website.

Visitors to the ASPCA website can now search through photos and profiles of over 70,000 adoptable dogs and cats currently in shelters across the country. Potential adopters can then contact shelters directly or share the animal's profile via Facebook® or e-mail.

"Millions of animal lovers already visit the ASPCA website regularly to stay updated on the vital work we do to fight animal cruelty and homelessness," said Betsey Fortlouis, Vice President of Member Communications for the ASPCA. "Now we can bring even more attention to the plight of homeless dogs and cats across the country by leveraging the power of social media to help drive adoptions."

The database of adoptable dogs and cats is the same one that powers DogTime Media's popular Save a Dog and Save a Cat Facebook applications. The data is provided by RescueGroups.org and is updated dynamically every 15 minutes.

"The ASPCA has added its considerable influence to the Save a Dog and Save a Cat cause that is central to DogTime Media's mission," said DogTime Media CEO, Trevor Wright. "We are proud to lend our support to the amazing work the ASPCA has been doing for nearly 145 years."

Qualifying shelters and rescue organizations can add their pets to the ASPCA site, along with all of the major pet adoption sites, for free. Simply sign up with the Pet Adoption Portal powered by RescueGroups.org, a non-profit organization that is 100 percent dedicated to helping welfare organizations work effectively to end the pet overpopulation problem.

The Save a Dog and Save a Cat applications by DogTime allow users to browse and virtually "foster" real animals in their neighborhood or anywhere in the country. Points are awarded to users for "petting" and "walking" fosters, and for inviting other Facebook users to co-foster an animal or to participate in a "play date". Users can also upload photos of their own dogs and cats, and vote to choose the Dog of the Week and Cat of the Week on Facebook.

For more information about DogTime Media and its Save a Dog and Save a Cat applications please visit http://www.dogtimemedia.com.

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Grumpy Old Gal Photo Shoot

It looks like Cookie, my grumpy old gal, has her fans. I guess her advanced age and grumpiness brings out the support from all of us who are getting older each year. We lived our lives-- now we can be grumpy.

I was asked to take a photo of her so everyone could see her. Wouldn't you know it? She decided not to sit still for the photo shoot. Nope, her grumpy old personality came shining through as she decided to be obstinate about it. No cute shot for her showing her age. No, indeed.

Here she is trying to look like a fun loving gal instead of Ms. Grumpy. After all, we did tell her that her story was going to help other homeless shelter dogs get food. And Ms. Grumpy C does like her food!





And here is Cookie after she settled down and decided that a photo shoot wasn't all bad after all.

That Cookie. She's a grump, and we love her. Even with her LDD-- that's Lap Deprivation Disorder.







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Monday, October 25, 2010

Saving Katie's Life

I predominately rescue Great Pyrenees dogs. Lately I have a little bit of everything from a beagle pup to an old senile Pyr. I was told about two Great Pyrenees dogs that wandered up to a house and were going to be taken to a kill shelter. My friend Michelle went to pick them up. When she arrived she found a small black lab with the Pyrs. She asked if she could bring the little girl along too since she seemed to have an injury and was limping. Seems we always go to pick up a Pyr and end up with just one more non-pyr!  Michelle named the lab, Katie. All three were taken to the vet the next day. The Great Pyrenees Rescue of Atlanta had taken the two Pyrs, 'Bonnie & Clyde' into their rescue and I was going to care for Katie.

Dr. Meredith Wesley at East Coweta Veterinary Hospital was examining Katie and sending me text messages. The first one said she had a fractured right femur that was old and poorly healed. The second one said, old badly healed fractures on left foot. Next came, cranial cruciate injury on left knee requiring surgery asap. And finally, Katie was heartworm positive.

I sat there in disbelief wondering how I was going to pay for this little dog that I hadn't even met yet. This was going to take thousands of dollars and who was going to adopt her? When I called to talk with Dr. Wesley, she told me that she knew this was more than my tiny rescue could handle and she would keep the dog herself and fix her all up. The only thing Dr. Wesley asked was that I take her afterwards if for some reason she did not fit into her household!

I am so amazed that Dr. Wesley saved Katie that day. What a huge act of kindness that I can never thank enough or repay. It just makes me so happy to know there are people like Dr. Wesley out there willing to help like she did. Katie is now on her road to recovery.

By Linda Palermo



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Help a Homeless Pet by Writing About Adoption

There's a great way to join in the giving of life with the Georgia Front Page and Fayette Front Page family this week with a stroke of your pen, er, computer keyboard.

For every blog written which focuses on the great benefits of pet adoption, Iams will donate 100 bowls of food to an Iams Home 4 the Holidays shelter in need.

It's easy to do.  Write your loving story about your adopted pet, and follow these instructions from Iams.

1. Write a blog post about Iams Home 4 the Holidays during the week of October 24. Save it as a draft and go to step 2.

2. Starting on October 24, go to www.PetCareBev.com. At the top of the blog will be a sticky post explaining how to enter your blog into the blog hop list.  Copy the HTML code and return to your blog post draft.

3. Add the HTML code from step 2 to the end of your draft blog post, in the HTML tab or view. Publish your blog post.

4. At the end of the blog hop list on your newly published post, you'll see a link named "Click here to enter." Click this link and add your blog post's title and URL link. This adds your blog post to the blog hop list!



Or you can enter your blog by clicking on our adoption experience post written on our If It Breathes.... blog.  Which ever way you choose, just write about a favorite adopted pet--  and help those who need some help while they wait for their new homes.

Editor
If It Breathes.....

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Did I Tell You About the Fish I Caught?

The tale of a dog who hooked my heart.

It all started on a warm summer Sunday afternoon when we went to look for a new fish.  Somehow, that fish turned into a beautiful old gal who hooked my heart from the first glance.

There she was in a small cage surrounded by other hopeful dogs looking for a new home.  There she was just barking her adorable little blonde head off.  And there I was on the other side of the store listening to the annoying sound.

The sound made me look at the cute poodle laying peacefully in the arms of a young girl.  Ahh, I just love poodles.  Why don't I go over and just pet the little darling?

By the time I wandered over to the adorable poodle, the barking dog was being held by Linda, the lady who runs the rescue group.  I touched the little blonde barking wonder and asked her name out of idle curiosity.  "Cassie."  Hmmm. I just love the name.

"Her owner turned her in when they lost her home.  I adopted her out last night, but she came back today with a puncture wound.  Her new home's pets didn't accept her."  My heart started to bleed.

I looked closer.  She had one patch of clear skin on her belly that was in the shape of a heart.  My heart began to bleed harder.

"She's older."  I looked at her again, and noticed the cataracts in her eyes.  And I was a goner.

"I'll adopt her on a trial basis and see if she gets along with my other two adopted dogs,"  I said as my amazed spouse and children looked at me like I had grown another head.  "She needs me."

And, so began our life with dear sweet Cassie, who we quickly renamed Cookie.  Cookie is a blonde terrier mix--  something like the front end of a Yorkie and the backside of a wire haired, with the coloring of a Westie.

She's old.  She's grumpy.  And our lives are brighter with her presence.

She's extremely addicted to laps.  Nothing makes her happier than a lap she can fill.  And nothing makes her sadder than being left alone.

We've had to work on controlling her nuisance barking with a bark collar.  She doesn't particularly like it, but she tolerates it.

She doesn't like taking pills.  In fact, she's the best I've ever seen at tricking us into thinking she has swallowed the pill and then gagging it up.

She's grumpy, but then she is an old woman.  What old woman do you know who feels her aches and pains and gets a tad bit grumpy?  What old lady needs to speak her mind--  and often?  I'd wager there are plenty of them around, but this little old dog gets to grumble until her heart is complete.

She's a sweetie and her presence has turned my poodle into a green eyed lap monster.  It used to be he really liked to have his own chair.  Now, he shares any available lap with our Cookie.

Our Cookie. The  adopted dog who started as a fish.

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Friday, October 22, 2010

Giant Panda Lun Lun Confirmed to be Pregnant

Zoo Atlanta’s Veterinary Team has observed a viable fetus during routine ultrasound procedures on female giant panda Lun Lun. Ultrasound images obtained since Monday the 18th confirm a growing fetus with a strong heartbeat. Based on the size of the fetus, which is currently 2.24 centimeters long, the Animal Management and Veterinary Teams estimate that a birth should occur in 10 days to 2 weeks. While cautiously optimistic, experts caution that Lun Lun could still miscarry or reabsorb the fetus as her pregnancy progresses.
 
Round-the-clock birth watch began on Monday, October 18 and will continue through birth and the first months of the cub’s life. Giant panda gestation averages 135 days, but can range from 83 to 197 days.

A cub would be the third offspring for Lun Lun and Yang Yang, both 13. The Animal Management and Veterinary Teams opted to employ artificial insemination (AI) on June 13, 2010, after the pair failed to mate naturally. Lun Lun’s and Yang Yang’s previous offspring, Mei Lan, 4 and now a resident of Chengdu, China, and Xi Lan, 2, a resident of Zoo Atlanta, were the only cubs born in the U.S. in 2006 and 2008. Both were the products of AI.

Additional updates will be provided as details are available. The Zoo’s giant pandas are watched daily by fans around the world on PandaCam presented by Earthcam. PandaCam, which runs Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., has remained the most visited page on zooatlanta.org since shortly after the arrival of Lun Lun and Yang Yang in 1999.


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Thursday, October 21, 2010

Be A Responsible Owner: Pick Up After Your Pet

(NAPSI)-Pet ownership is at an all-time high, with 75 million dogs in 45 million households, according to the National Pet Owners Survey conducted by the American Pet Products Association. And more people are hitting the road with their dogs as well. Neighborhood walks and days at the park are now expanding to outings at the dog park and visits to dog-friendly local establishments.

Before hitting the trail or sidewalk with your dog, take a few steps to make sure that your best friend is a good neighbor as well.

• Leash training—Most communities have leash laws. Even if your dog is well trained, keeping him or her on a leash is a good idea because dogs can be startled by unfamiliar noises and run away or bolt into traffic.

• Dog parks and dog training—Many communities now have dog parks that provide open areas for your pet to roam, run or romp with other dogs. Make sure your dog has proper obedience training before hitting the park. If your dog knows simple commands, it makes for a more enjoyable experience for everyone.

• The tag’s the thing—Many dog parks and recreation areas require that dogs wear ID tags and their current rabies and registration tags. Even if your dog stays in your yard, tags are a good idea, so you may reunite quickly should your dog slip out.

• Cleaning up after your dog—An average-sized dog weighs 40 pounds and produces about ¾ of a pound of waste a day, which translates to over 13 million tons of waste a year for 75 million dogs. The bacteria found in pet waste poses health risks. Due to the carnivorous feeding habits of domestic animals, their waste contains bacteria, which in turn can cause diseases that are harmful to both humans and pets.

Pet waste has been identified by the EPA as a major cause of nonpoint source pollution caused by rainwater runoff. The EPA and CDC advise that the safest place for pet waste is bagged and placed in a landfill and discourage the composting of pet waste.

• Clean up in style—Since 1995, Bags on Board has encouraged pet owners to pick up after their pets using their stylish dispensers. The compact, refillable dispensers attach to any type of leash and contain a roll of pickup bags. Need a place to stash your keys, cell phone or other items? Adjustable and fashionable Purse Dispensers and Pouch Dispensers can be worn around the waist or across the chest and discreetly dispense pickup bags and provide storage for other items. Other fun dispensers, such as the Ball Dispenser, are also available.

For more information, visit www.bagsonboard.com.

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Wednesday, October 20, 2010

October brings milestones for four famous gorillas

 The concept of a legendary gorilla didn’t die with the iconic Willie B. Ivan, the silverback who became a figure of national interest when he arrived at Zoo Atlanta after 27 years as the “shopping mall gorilla,” has his 16th anniversary in his adopted city this month. Kuchi, the mother who astonished the zoological community by rearing a rare set of twins herself, turned 26 on October 10. Her celebrated offspring, Kali and Kazi, turn 5 on October 31.

“Gorillas have been a flagship species for the Zoo ever since Willie B., but events like Ivan’s anniversary or Kali’s and Kazi’s birthday remind us of the deep level of interest, empathy and love our collection inspires in the community,” said Dwight Lawson, PhD, Deputy Director. “Now that western lowland gorillas are critically endangered, it’s more important than ever that our individuals serve as ambassadors for their counterparts in the wild.”

Ivan’s story is one of Zoo Atlanta’s most memorable happy endings. Born in Africa in 1962, he was captured as an infant and sold to the owners of a department store in Tacoma, Wash., where he lived for nearly three decades in a solitary indoor enclosure. By the mid 1990s, the silverback’s living conditions had inspired a highly-publicized movement for his relocation, prompting Ivan’s owners to donate their celebrity tenant to Seattle’s Woodland Park Zoo. Leadership in the care and study of western lowland gorillas were already trademarks for Zoo Atlanta, with the world-class Ford African Rain Forest having opened to national acclaim just six years earlier. Recognizing the importance of giving Ivan the opportunity to become a social gorilla and with the recommendation of the Species Survival Plan (SSP), Woodland Park Zoo placed Ivan on permanent loan to Zoo Atlanta in October 1994.

Now 47, Ivan lives with a female companion, Kinyani, 27. He is one of the Zoo’s most recognized and beloved individuals, widely known for his characteristic disdain of cold weather and for his paintings, which he “signs” with a thumbprint. Even after 16 years, his popularity with his original fan base remains undiminished. Zoo Atlanta receives letters, emails, calls and even Facebook posts every year from Ivan’s friends on the West Coast.

On the opposite end of the age spectrum, juvenile twins Kali (male) and Kazi (female) were a Halloween surprise for keepers reporting to work the morning of October 31, 2005. In the days and months following the births, Kuchi surprised experts worldwide by rearing both infants independently – a feat no other gorilla has ever accomplished – a distinction she still holds. Today, the 26-year-old has just one busy infant to supervise: Henry, born May 22, 2010. While he’s not yet old enough to roughhouse with Kali and Kazi and their half-siblings Macy Baby and Gunther, both 4, the youngsters will be ready playmates once their baby brother is allowed outside Kuchi’s famously protective grip.

Zoo Atlanta is home to the nation’s largest collection of western lowland gorillas, with 23 individuals living in distinct social groups. In addition to Ivan, the Zoo also houses three other gorillas over the age of 45: Shamba, 51, Ozzie, 49, and Choomba, 49.




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Tuesday, October 19, 2010

GA Heartland Humane Society holding 7th Annual Doggie Dash in Peachtree City October 30 fundraiser includes walk, costume contest at Shakerag Knoll

Dog owners and lovers, plus their furry, four-legged friends, are invited to participate in the Seventh Annual Doggie Dash, a major fund-raising event benefiting the Georgia Heartland Humane Society, on Saturday, October 30, 2010. This 3k (or 1.86 mile) walk meanders through the shady trails of Shakerag Knoll in Peachtree City, GA, and will provide a one-of-a kind opportunity for you and your pet to “Trick or Treat” together.

"We encourage the community to get involved by forming teams and competing to see which team raises the most money," said Barbara Grosse, Fund Raising Coordinator for Georgia Heartland. "There will be a prize valued at $100.00 for the team that raises the most money."

Registration to participate in the Doggie Dash will begin at 9:00 a.m. and the walk will officially start at 10:00 a.m. Adults, children and their doggie companions are encouraged to show off their Halloween finery during the walk, and then join us for the Costume Contest at 11:30 a.m. There will be a variety of retail and service vendors on hand, a live Disc Jockey playing your favorite tunes, “Pupcasio” – paw painting for dogs, fantastic door prizes and ghoulishly good snacks and treats for humans and dogs alike!

"This is a great opportunity for animal lovers to make a difference in the lives of companion animals in our community", said Grosse. "The money raised at Doggie Dash will help provide food and shelter for the pets of those who are having a difficult time caring for them in this economic climate. It is our goal to help people keep their pets rather than abandoning them or turning them into Animal Control"

The Georgia Heartland Humane Society is a non-profit organization that was founded in 1996 and relies solely on the generosity of public donations. In order to keep their current rescue and community assistance programs, such as the Guest Pet services, the animal Food Bank, Seniors for Seniors and Sponsor a Permanent Foster, they have created a unique opportunity for individuals, as well as companies and community businesses, to support their efforts by participating as an event sponsor and/or sponsored walker.

Each walker that raises or donates a minimum of $35.00 will receive a specially-designed Doggie Dash T-shirt and scarf, plus become eligible to participate in the drawing for door prizes. For our event sponsors, your name will be printed on our official T-shirt, categorized by you tax deductible donation of $100.00 (Silver Paw), $250.00 (Gold Paw), or $500.00 (Platinum Paw).

Forms for event sponsors, as well as sponsored walkers, can be found on the Georgia Heartland Humane Society web site at www.gaheartland.com. All dogs attending this event must have a current rabies tag and be kept on a leash

For more information, please contact Anne Janis at (404) 403-64897 or at annej4ghhs@yahoo.com .


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Monday, October 18, 2010

Giant Panda Birth Watch 2010

One of Atlanta’s best-known celebrity moms may be carrying cub number three. Recent data suggest that giant panda Lun Lun has entered the secondary rise in the telltale hormonal fluctuations that indicate she is nearing the end of a pregnancy or pseudopregnancy. Based on this information, the Zoo Atlanta Animal Management and Veterinary Team plans to begin round-the-clock birth watch on Monday, October 18.

In addition to hormonal changes, Lun Lun experienced a dramatic shift in behavior – most notably extreme lethargy and reduced appetite – this week. These behavioral changes occur in pregnant and pseudopregnant giant pandas. The animal care and veterinary teams are monitoring the 13-year-old bear closely and conducting regular ultrasounds. Giant panda gestation averages 135 days, but can range from 83-197 days.

Confirming pregnancy in giant pandas is a famously inexact science, as the species experiences delayed implantation and can also exhibit pseudopregnancy, a condition closely mimicking pregnancy without the presence of a fetus. A new test for pregnancy detection in giant pandas has been developed which seems promising. While early results indicated that Lun Lun was pregnant, more recent results are less certain. Because the assay is new and has only been used on a few giant pandas, it is not considered 100 percent reliable. Therefore, Zoo Atlanta staff is preparing for a birth in the same way as in previous years. Birth watch will continue on October 18 and will continue through November 14.

The animal care team opted to employ artificial insemination (AI) on June 13, 2010, after Lun Lun and 13-year-old Yang Yang failed to mate during her brief window of fertility. The pair has two previous offspring, female Mei Lan, age 4 and a resident of Chengdu, China, and male Xi Lan, 2, a resident of Zoo Atlanta. Both Mei Lan and Xi Lan were the only giant panda cubs born in the U.S. in 2006 and 2008, and both were the products of AI.

Additional updates will be provided as details are available.


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Chronic Wasting Disease Not Present in Georgia

Prohibiting chronic wasting disease from entering Georgia is an ongoing effort. Anyone interested in wildlife – hunters, wildlife watchers and processors, among others – are encouraged to help keep Georgia’s quality deer herd CWD-free.

CWD, a contagious neurological disease affecting deer, elk and moose, belongs to a group of diseases known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, the same group of diseases affecting some domestic animals, including bovine spongiform encephalopathy or “mad cow disease.”

Hunters can help reduce the risk of spreading CWD into Georgia by understanding current regulations that prohibit the importation of live cervids and restrict the importation of certain cervid carcass parts from known CWD-infected states.

“The potential introduction of CWD poses a serious threat to Georgia’s economically and culturally valuable white-tailed deer resource,” explains John W. Bowers, assistant chief of Game Management for the Wildlife Resources Division. “We encourage hunters to be knowledgeable of and to abide by current importation regulations and restrictions.”

According to current hunting regulations, importation of any live cervid is prohibited. In addition, importation of any whole cervid carcass or carcass parts from any state with a documented CWD case is prohibited with the following exceptions:  boned-out meat, commercially processed meat, meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached, clean skull plates with antlers attached, clean antlers, finished taxidermy heads or clean upper canines (buglers, whistlers, ivories).

This fatal disease attacks the nervous system of cervids and to date has been detected in 18 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces, including Colorado, Illinois, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming and the Canadian provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta. Virginia, Missouri and North Dakota discovered their first cases of CWD earlier this year.

Infected animals develop a characteristic spongy degeneration of the brain, which results in extreme weight loss, abnormal behavior, loss of bodily functions and eventually, death. Though scientific investigations are ongoing, current research suggests that the agent responsible for the disease may be spread both directly (animal to animal contact) and indirectly (soil or other surface to animal).

Currently, there is no evidence that CWD poses a risk for humans.

Other Georgians can help by reporting any known illegal importation of deer species or carcasses to the department at 1-800-241-4113.

Residents also should avoid feeding deer as this unnaturally concentrates animals and increases the likelihood of disease and parasite transmission.

Since 1998, the division has been testing suspect and hunter-harvested deer for evidence of CWD. To date, more than 5,500 deer have been tested with no confirmed positives. The states nearest to Georgia with a confirmed case of CWD are Illinois, West Virginia and Virginia.

For more information about CWD in Georgia or for general information regarding deer hunting in Georgia, visit the division’s Web site at www.gohuntgeorgia.com and search under “Hunting” and “Game Management.” For more information about CWD in general, visit the Chronic Wasting Disease Alliance’s Web site at www.cwd-info.org .

Any hunter who observes or harvests a deer in Georgia that exhibits CWD symptoms should immediately call a local Wildlife Resources Division office or call 1-800-241-4113.

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Thursday, October 14, 2010

Pointers On Protecting Your Pets From Poisoning

(NAPSI)-By being alert to the danger, you may be able to keep your precious pets from poisoning themselves.

The Problem

Pet owners often joke about pets being like vacuum cleaners--literally eating anything put in front of them. Unfortunately, that lack of dietary discretion too often results in pets ingesting toxic substances, emergency visits to the veterinarian and large medical bills.

The Top Troublemakers

The nation's oldest and largest provider of pet health insurance has analyzed its database of nearly half a million pets to find the sources behind the thousands of poisoning claims it receives each year. Here is a ranking of the 13 most-common pet poisoning claims Veterinary Pet Insurance Co. (VPI) sees:

1. Accidental ingestion of medications (pet or human drugs)

2. Rodenticide (mouse and rat poison)

3. Methylxanthine toxicity (chocolate and caffeine)

4. Plant poisoning

5. Household chemical

6. Metaldehyde (snail and slug poison)

7. Insecticide

8. Heavy metal toxicity (lead and zinc)

9. Toad poisoning

10. Antifreeze poisoning

11. Walnut poisoning

12. Alcohol toxicity

13. Strychnine.

Accidental ingestion of pet or human medications is the most common type of poisoning. The most expensive type of poisoning, heavy metal poisoning, can cost more than $1,000 to treat.

What To Look For

It helps if pet owners are alert to signs of trouble. "Depending on what substance the pet has ingested and the amount, the reaction can be sudden, with the animal exhibiting alarming symptoms such as staggering, vomiting, drooling, seizures and even loss of consciousness," said veterinarian Carol McConnell. "We recommend that pet owners be aware of which items around their homes can be harmful to their pets--medications, insect poisons, chocolate and certain nuts--and keep these items safely out of reach."

An Example

Consider the case of Patricia Reinhold of North Las Vegas, Nev. She spent nearly $500 at her veterinarian's office after her Pomeranian Baxter managed to sip up a spilled beer. She knew something was wrong when Baxter began to stumble and fall over.

"Most people might not worry about this, or think it was funny, but I wasn't about to take a chance with Baxter," said Reinhold. "We took him to the vet, who put him on an IV and flushed his kidneys to get the alcohol out of his system. He recovered, but a couple weeks later we had to take him in for a precautionary liver test to make sure that he had all his enzymes and liver function."

Reinhold's quick thinking highlights the importance of preparation in the event of a pet emergency. Pet owners should keep the phone number of their pets' regular veterinarian and a number for an emergency veterinary hospital handy at all times and have a financial plan for handling unexpected pet expenses.

"I'm the kind of person who wouldn't hesitate to spend $10,000 on my pets," said Reinhold. "So for me, having pet insurance isn't about never having to pay for my pets' veterinary bills or saving money but getting help with the things I know I will have to pay for, and I like knowing that help is there. Because you can guarantee that with a dog like Baxter, I haven't seen the end of it."

Learn More

For more information about pet poisoning prevention and poisoning first aid, visit the Pet Poison Helpline at www.petpoisonhelpline.com. For more information about pet health insurance, visit www.petinsurance.com.


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Firearms Deer Season Opens Saturday, Oct. 16th

It is finally that time of the year again for Georgia hunters. Firearms deer season opens Saturday, Oct. 16 and lasts through Jan. 1, 2011 in the Northern Zone and in the Southern Zone, through Jan. 15, 2011.

“Regulated hunting is the most cost effective and efficient means of managing the deer herd,” says John W. Bowers, assistant chief of Game Management for the Wildlife Resources Division. “In addition, sportsmen and women provide more than $30 million each year to fund wildlife conservation in the state through license fees and self-imposed excise taxes collected on the purchase of firearms, ammunition, archery equipment and fishing equipment.”

More than one million acres of public hunting land is available to hunters in Georgia, including more than 100 state-operated wildlife management areas.  In addition to traditional hunters, many special hunts are offered, including ladies-only and adult/child hunts. Dates and locations for these hunts, as well as WMA maps, are available in the 2010-2011 Georgia Hunting Seasons and Regulations guide .

During the 2009-2010 firearms deer season, 305,000 licensed hunters harvested more than 398,000 deer in Georgia.

Hunters are allowed a season total of ten antlerless deer and two antlered deer (one of the two antlered deer must have a minimum of four points, one inch or longer, on one side of the antlers).

A valid hunting license is required to hunt deer during firearms season, as is a big game license and a deer harvest record. In most cases, a separate WMA license is required to hunt on a WMA. All deer hunters must wear at least 500 square-inches of fluorescent orange above the waist to legally hunt during firearms season, except on archery-only areas.

Georgia is considered the top destination in the country for non-resident hunters and continues to draw tens of thousands of hunters from across the country each year. The state’s quality deer herd and the availability of vast acres of public hunting land serve as the main appeal.

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Friday, October 8, 2010

Southern Company Partners with Operation Migration USA to Conserve Endangered Whooping Crane; Sponsorship Enters Third Year

/PRNewswire/ -- As Operation Migration begins its 10th annual multi-state trek, designed to conserve the whooping crane, Southern Company is once again on board as a sponsor.

Southern Company will be a sponsor of the migration for the third consecutive year. The unique effort, in which the endangered birds are taught a migration route by following ultralight aircraft, is set to begin this month.

This year's journey will take about a dozen birds from Wisconsin to Florida. The migration will cover 1,285 miles and pass through seven states, including three served by Southern Company subsidiaries – Alabama (Alabama Power), Georgia (Georgia Power) and Florida (Gulf Power).

During the migration, Southern Company is the presenting sponsor of Operation Migration's daily EarlyBird E-bulletin. To subscribe, send your name and e-mail address to barbara@operationmigration.org and include "EarlyBird" in the subject field.

The mission of Operation Migration USA Inc. is to promote the conservation of migratory species, including the whooping crane. The non-profit organization seeks to increase the number of whooping cranes it rears and leads south with the goal of helping the population reach a self-sustaining level.

A three-year grant to Operation Migration USA was made beginning in 2008 through Power of Flight, a partnership between Southern Company and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation (NFWF) to protect birds through habitat and species restoration and environmental education.

"We continue to be inspired by the dedication and effort shown by our partners at Operation Migration USA, and look forward to working with them on another whooping crane migration," said Chris Hobson, Southern Company chief environmental officer. "Partnerships such as this are the essence of our commitment to be a leader in environmental stewardship."

"Each year, the journey from central Wisconsin to the west coast of Florida is part thrill, part challenge," said Joe Duff, Operation Migration CEO and senior pilot. "Featuring humans, animals, aircraft and, without fail, many life lessons, it is the ultimate reality show – and the best edge-of-seat drama a wildlife conservation project could offer."

"Seeing our Power of Flight project with Southern Company yield such positive outcomes is extremely rewarding," said Jeff Trandahl, executive director of NFWF. "We're optimistic about the progress of the migration effort and the eventual restoration of the crane population."

The cranes led on the migration are hatched at the U.S. Geological Survey's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Maryland. They are taught to follow specially modified ultralight aircraft before being shipped to Wisconsin at about 50 days of age. Eventually, they follow a fleet of three ultralight aircraft on their first southward migration.

Once the birds learn the migratory route, they return on their own the following spring. Each year a new generation is taught the route and released. Once the flock reaches 125 birds, including 25 breeding pairs, it can be considered self-sustaining.

The migration can take from 50 to 90 days as the schedule is affected by weather. Progress reports and photos are updated regularly and posted on Operation Migration's website at http://www.operationmigration.org/Field_Journal.html.

Since 2001, Operation Migration has played a lead role in the reintroduction of endangered whooping cranes into eastern North America. During the 1940s, only 15 birds survived in the world, although the species was not declared endangered until 1971. The primary reason for the birds' disappearance was over hunting and the destruction of its natural habitat; however, thanks to conservation efforts, nearly 500 whooping cranes survive today in wild populations and in captive breeding centers.

Operation Migration USA Inc. is a 501 (c) 3 nonprofit organization dedicated to promoting the conservation of migratory species through innovative research, education and partnerships. Operation Migration is a founding partner of the Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership, the coalition of non-profit organizations and government agencies behind the project to safeguard the endangered whooping crane from extinction.

A nonprofit established by Congress in 1984, The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation sustains, restores and enhances the nation's fish, wildlife, plants and habitats. Through leadership conservation investments with public and private partners, NFWF is dedicated to achieving maximum conservation impact. Since its establishment, the Foundation has awarded over 10,000 grants to more than 3,700 organizations in the United States and abroad and leveraged, with its partners, more than $635 million into over $1.6 billion for conservation.

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Thursday, October 7, 2010

Finding The Right Pet For Your Family

(StatePoint)  After hearing "Please can we get a puppy or kitten?" from your children hundreds of times, you may finally be considering adding a furry friend to your family portrait.

Matching the right dog or cat to your family can be confusing, however. There are 167 American Kennel Club-recognized dogs breeds and 40 Cat Fanciers' Association-recognized cat breeds barking and meowing for attention.

"Before selecting a pet, research different breeds, talk to breeders, vets and consult dog and cat-owning friends to get a clear picture of what the commitment requires," says Gina DiNardo, a spokesperson for the American Kennel Club.

There are many suitable options for families of all ages and activity levels. You just have to know what questions to ask.

What Kind of Family are You?

If you are extremely active and enjoy running, then a Border Collie or Abyssinian would make a wonderful dog or cat. The Border Collie is very athletic, energetic and thrives on outdoor work. The Abyssinian cat, meanwhile, is busy, active, agenda-driven and friendly.

Is your family outdoorsy? Then the Labrador Retriever, the most popular dog breed in America according to AKC registration statistics, may be right for you. Labs are playful, loving and hardworking and do best in an active family. Cats are basically indoor creatures, but the Cornish Rex is active, racy and affectionate, and even will play fetch with you indoors.

Do your kids prefer to stay inside and play? A dog or cat that enjoys the shelter of home and constant companionship would be best, such as a Bulldog, Pug, LaPerm or Ragdoll.  

Good News for Allergy Sufferers

Allergy sufferers still can have pets! There are breeds with coats that don't shed and produce less dander. Some examples of dogs for allergy sufferers are the Portuguese Water Dog, Poodle, and Maltese. Cats that would be best for allergy sufferers include the Oriental, Colorpoint Shorthair, and Sphynx. The Colorpoint Shorthair cats are especially good because they have little dander, while the Sphynx is mostly hairless.

Fitting Your Living Space

Consider the size of your home. Do you live in a duplex or small apartment or a large house? 

If you have limited space, a Toy dog breed or the Exotic cat might be best. The Yorkshire Terrier is a big personality in a small dog that requires limited exercise due to its small size. The Exotic cat is playful, easygoing and has a quiet, endearing nature.  

If your home is spacious, you might consider a Sporting dog breed, such as a Golden Retriever, or a Russian Blue cat. Goldens are intelligent, active and energetic, requiring daily exercise. Russian Blue cats are intelligent and affectionate, and have even been reported to open doors and teach their owners to fetch!

For more information on selecting a pet for your family and to "meet" and learn about the more than 200 dog and cat breeds, play fun games and watch dog and cat videos, visit www.meetthebreeds.com.     

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Wednesday, October 6, 2010

Iams Home 4 the Holidays Embarks on a Misstion to Save the Lives of Orphaned Pets

Annual Pet Adoption Drive Launches Campaign to Provide 5 Million Bowls of Food to Orphaned Pets

One of the world’s largest pet adoption programs – Iams Home 4 the Holidays – kicked off today to help place 1.5 million orphaned pets into loving homes this holiday season. Between Oct. 1, 2010 and Jan. 4, 2011, Iams will work side-by-side with founding partner Helen Woodward Animal Center and 3,500 animal organizations worldwide to not only help pets find homes but to provide 5 million bowls of food through the inaugural Bags 4 Bowls program.

Each year shelters and rescue centers are overwhelmed and overcrowded with as many as 8 million homeless animals. Because of this staggering statistic, the core mission of Iams Home 4 the Holidays continues to be to drastically reduce the number of homeless pets through adoption.

“Pet homelessness is an epidemic in our country and many animal organizations look to programs like Iams Home 4 the Holidays to help drive families to our centers to see these amazing animals,” said Mike Arms, founder of the adoption drive and president of Helen Woodward Animal Center. “We’ve been a part of the adoption drive for 12 years now and have really seen the benefit of what this program can do for animals, our employees and the families who adopt.”

While adoption is paramount, the campaign acknowledges that not everyone is in the position to bring a new pet into their home. This year visitors to Iams’ Facebook page (www.facebook.com/iams) can follow the program’s “Adoption Angels,” new pet parents chronicling their personal journeys of adoption. Visitors can see first-hand as the Angels experience the joy of adoption and how they integrate their new four-legged family member into the home.

In addition to the Adoption Angels, Iams created the Bags 4 Bowls program so that anyone can help make a difference in the lives of orphaned animals by buying a bag of Iams food. For every specially marked package of Iams dog or cat food purchased during the campaign – Oct. 1, 2010 through Jan. 4, 2011 – Iams will donate one bowl of food to a participating animal organization.* Additionally, anyone can visit the Facebook page and “Like” the page itself, various messages, photos, videos, etc. posted by the Adoption Angels and in return Iams will donate up to 100 meals per “Like” or comment to feed orphaned animals.

“We’re very proud of the fact that we’ve helped more than 4.6 million animals find homes over the last 11 years,” said Maria Beatriz Rodriguez, Iams general manager. “Our core mission has been and remains to reduce pet homelessness through adoption. However we want to empower everyone
to get involved and make difference so we created the Bags 4 Bowls program. Our goal is to find homes for 1.5 million animals and provide 5 million bowls of food – that’s a lot of permanent homes and meals for millions of deserving animals.”

Iams Home 4 the Holidays strives to educate about the importance of adoption so that every pet adopted goes to a permanent, loving home. Families who adopt through the program will receive an Iams adoption kit loaded with important information about nutrition, training and proper care to ensure that the relationship with the new animal starts off on the right paw.

Iams works with all of the partnering organizations to ensure they have the tools needed to promote themselves and their pets. One of the primary tools Iams shares with participants is a detailed “how-to-guide” that includes template materials, guides for event planning, tips for working within their local communities, and more. Iams has also established a dedicated toll-free phone number (800-421-6456) for animal organizations to call seven days a week for help and guidance with adoption needs and questions.

To learn more about how to make a difference in the life of an orphaned pet, including how to get involved, details about pets available for adoption, fun ways to donate meals and quick access to informative content and tips, visit www.facebook.com/iams.

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Tuesday, October 5, 2010

Going Green with Alpaca


With world focus now on going green and making a soft imprint on the earth, the alpaca is taking center stage on the agricultural scene.

Alpacas are fairly new to North America with the first importation of this small camelid into the U.S. in 1984. Alpacas are native to South America, particularly Peru, Bolivia and Chile and were coveted by the Incan royalty.

4-H, FFA and like clubs are increasingly involved as youngsters enjoy interacting with the gentle, humming alpaca which weigh between 100 lbs. and 200 lbs. at maturity. Baby alpacas, crias, typically weigh about 17 lbs. at birth. As five alpacas can be supported on just one acre of good pasture, the aspect of raising alpacas for the gentleman farmer is easily within reach. City dwellers are included in the opportunity with many larger alpaca farms offering boarding services.

This eco-friendly animal needs to be in a group of at least two to prosper, requires only about two pounds of grass hay or grass per day per 125 pounds of body weight, plus some mineral supplementation. They tread gently on soft, padded feet, much like a dog's foot, that do not tear up pasture as hooved animals do. Alpacas have only four teeth on the bottom and a hard gum called a dental pad on the top of their mouths, allowing them to nibble off only the tops of grass with less disturbance to plant roots than other grazing livestock. They also have molars at the back of their jaws for chewing cud.

Articles in publications such as The Wall Street Journal along with TV ads have spurred interest in the investment opportunities and tax benefits of ownership. The relative ease of raising this gentle, fiber animal appeals increasingly to those heading into retirement.

The number of alpaca farms is increasing in Georgia and across the U.S. Two types of alpaca, differentiated by their fiber type, allows for fleece preference. The Huacaya (wa-kai-a) has dense, highly crimped, soft fleece that grows perpendicular to the body. The Suri (surrey), rarer of the two breeds, has a straighter, very lustrous fiber that drapes down the side of the body.

While raising alpacas offers one aspect of the benefits to this livestock option, the fiber produced with a once a year shearing is the icing. Recognized as the elite, natural fiber, there are 22 natural colors. White and fawn fleeces are very easily dyed. Each alpaca can produce between 4 and 10 pounds of prime fleece each year. The fiber is spun into yarn and can then be knitted, woven or felted. Alpaca fiber does not contain lanolin, is hypoallergenic, and appeals to those who cannot wear wool.

Alpacas are a natural for creating sustainable agriculture. More details are readily obtained from the Georgia Alpaca Association. This organization is presenting The Royal Alpaca Challenge on November 6 & 7, 2010 at the site of the Olympic equestrian events, the Georgia International Horse Park, in Conyers, GA (28 miles east of Atlanta just off I-20). This is an opportunity to talk directly with the owners who raise and show these unique, fiber animals. Children and adults will delight in this free, family friendly event! 

www.RoyalAlpacaChallenge.com or RoyalAlpacaChallenge@alpacamoon.com

Reward Offered in Bear Killing in Murray County, Ga.

The Humane Society of the United States and The Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust are offering a reward of up to $2,500 for information leading to the identification, arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for illegally killing a black bear in Murray County, Ga. The offer adds to an existing reward from Turn in Poachers, Inc.

The Case:

According to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, sometime around the last week of February, a female black bear was killed illegally in the Peoples Lake area on Buck Creek Road. The poaching took place on United States Forest Service property. The bear was killed while hibernating in a den with her newborn cubs.

It is suspected that those responsible for the poaching may have also taken the bear cubs. Investigators believe that the perpetrator or perpetrators, along with the cubs, may be in the Blue Ridge or Epworth area of Fannin County, Ga.

“This tragic crime demonstrates the blatant disregard poachers have for the laws intended to protect wildlife,” said Cheryl McAuliffe, Georgia state director for The HSUS. “The Humane Society of the United States applauds the Georgia DNR for aggressively pursuing this investigation.”

The individual or individuals responsible could face charges including killing a black bear out of season, an aggravated misdemeanor with fines up to $1,500.

Poaching:

Wildlife officials estimate that for every wild animal killed legally — tens of millions of animals per year — another is killed illegally.
Bears are sometimes poached for their parts which can fetch thousands of dollars on the black market.
Every year, thousands of poachers are arrested nationwide; however, it is estimated that only 1 percent to 5 percent of poached animals are caught by law enforcement.
Poachers injure or kill wildlife anytime, anywhere and sometimes do so in particularly cruel ways. Wildlife officials report that poachers often commit other crimes as well.
The HSUS and HSWLT work with state and federal wildlife agencies to offer rewards of $2,500 for information leading to arrest and conviction of suspected poachers.

The Investigators:

Anyone with information about this poaching case is asked to call Cpl. Casey Jones or Sgt. John Vanlandingham via the Turn in Poachers hotline at 1-800-241-4113 or the Georgia DNR Region 1 Law Enforcement office at 706-624-1367. Callers may remain anonymous.

Turn in Poachers (TIP) Inc., is a conservation organization whose purpose is to serve as a poaching deterrent.  TIP is a partnership of private sportsmen/women, concerned citizens and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Wildlife Resources Division working to foster conservation. Easy access to DNR's Wildlife Resources Division through a 24-hour toll free "TIP hotline" (1-800-241-4113) helps citizens report wildlife related crimes. TIP provides funds in the form of rewards ($100 or more for information that leads to the arrest of the violator) to fight poaching.  TIP is not anti-hunting, it is anti-poaching and supports conservation through encouraging the public to get involved and report poachers.



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Reward Offered in Deer Poaching at Park in Georgia

The Humane Society of the United States and The Humane Society Wildlife Land Trust are offering a reward of up to $2,500 for information leading to the identification, arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for illegally killing a whitetail deer near Fargo, Ga. The offer adds to an existing reward from Turn in Poachers, Inc.

The Case:

According to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources, a buck deer was illegally killed in Stephen Foster State Park sometime between Sept. 11 and Sept. 15. The buck had been observed in the area a few days before. The poachers removed the deer’s antlers and left the rest of the animal’s body behind.

“The individuals or individuals responsible for this callous poaching deserve to be brought to justice for their crime, and we implore anyone with information about this incident to come forward,” said Cheryl McAuliffe, Georgia state director for The HSUS. “The Humane Society of the United States thanks the Georgia DNR for their tireless efforts to find those responsible.”

The individual or individuals responsible could face charges including hunting illegally in a state park, a crime punishable with fines up to $1,000.

Poaching:

Wildlife officials estimate that for every wild animal killed legally — tens of millions of animals per year — another is killed illegally.
Every year, thousands of poachers are arrested nationwide; however, it is estimated that only 1 percent to 5 percent of poached animals are caught by law enforcement.
Poachers injure or kill wildlife anytime, anywhere and sometimes do so in particularly cruel ways. Wildlife officials report that poachers often commit other crimes as well.
The HSUS and HSWLT work with state and federal wildlife agencies to offer rewards of $2,500 for information leading to arrest and conviction of suspected poachers.
The HSUS and HSWLT work to curb poaching across the country. Visit humanesociety.org/poaching for more information.

The Investigators:

Anyone with information about this case is asked to call RFC Jason Shipes via the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hot line at 1-800-241-4113 or Georgia DNR Region 6 Law Enforcement office at 912-685-2145. Callers may remain anonymous.

Turn in Poachers (TIP) Inc., is a conservation organization whose purpose is to serve as a poaching deterrent.  TIP is a partnership of private sportsmen/women, concerned citizens and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources (DNR) Wildlife Resources Division working to foster conservation. Easy access to DNR's Wildlife Resources Division through a 24-hour toll free "TIP hotline" (1-800-241-4113) helps citizens report wildlife related crimes. TIP provides funds in the form of rewards ($100 or more for information that leads to the arrest of the violator) to fight poaching.  TIP is not anti-hunting, it is anti-poaching and supports conservation through encouraging the public to get involved and report poachers.  Visit georgiawildlife.com/node/452 for more information.


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